Tagging content within an organisation

My last post looked at the importance of search as the main function of an organisational intranet. Search capabilities on any platform rely on the correct tagging and categorisation of the data added onto the platform. So how does an organisation ensure the correct tagging and categorisation of content? Whilst there will always be an element of human error, there are simple ways to minimise the risk of erroneous content tagging.

The easiest way is to predefine and predict what content is going to be uploaded and offer predetermined tags and meta data for content editors to use. This is by far the simplest way, but it is pretty basic in terms of the variety and the creation of new tags and new categories.

There are more refined options available. Firstly the emergence of intelligent platforms, which suggest tags and relevant categories based on the core content within the data. This is a great way of correctly tagging content based on actual content. The issue here is that the suggested tags have to be predefined otherwise there could be an infinite amount of tags and categories.
The third option, which develops on the previous two points is to ‘crowdsource’ the correct tags and let the users decide how the content should be tagged and categorised. Again I’d offer recommended master tags but then it would be over to the audience to choose the most relevant tags. This works as the audience actually engages in the content as they have an interest in the task they are doing. This also keeps the tags current and relevant to the audience.

The importance of tagging is essential to the success of any contemporary intranet. These are a few of the methods used in encouraging correct content tagging and categorisation. There are more sophisticated methods of data categorisation in which platforms use both intelligent suggestions based on the data and crowdsourcing but the above methods are the fundamental methods used across all platforms.